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Other Pokémon Games This section is for all Pokémon game discussion threads which don't involve the main generation games.
You may post about games such as Pokémon Mystery Dungeon, Pokémon Ranger or Pokémon Rumble.
This section can also be used to discuss the Pokémon Trading Card Game.



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Old 04-07-2005 (09:48 PM)
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Cool Basic Rules an Gameplay

***Mods and/or Admins, if this violates any rules....shoot me***
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Well, every forum needs newby guide. For those of you who are newbs to the game, I just thught that I'd make this thread to help you out These are the basic rules and gameplay for the TCG.

Basic Rules:

What Do You Need to Play?
Well, you and your opponent each need your own deck of 60 cards, a coin to flip, and some counters to mark damage to your Pokémon. You can use pennies or whatever else you want if you run out of counters.

What's the Pokémon Game Like?
You and your opponent are Pokémon trainers, battling it out to see who's the greatest Pokémon trainer of all time! You and your deck of cards (those are your Pokémon and the abilities you have as trainer) will fight against your opponent and his or her deck.

You'll have one Pokémon, called your "Active Pokémon", fighting for you. You can have other Pokémon waiting behind the Active Pokémon on your "Bench". If your Active Pokémon loses the fight by getting Knocked Out, then you pick one of those Pokémon on your Bench to be your new Active Pokémon.

Object of the Game
You win the game if any one or more of these things occur:

You win if you collect all of your Prize cards. When you begin the game, each player sets aside six Prize cards. Each time you Knock Out one of your opponent's Pokémon, you take one of your own Prizes (not your opponent's!) and put it into your hand. You win when you take your final Prize card.
You win if your opponent's deck is out of cards at the beginning of his or her turn.
You win if your opponent has no Pokémon on the Bench to replace his or her Active Pokémon, and his or her Active Pokémon gets Knocked Out. That means there's no one for your Pokémon to fight against, so you win!

Starting the Game

Flip a coin to decide who goes first. You can use your special Pokémon coin, if you have one.
Shuffle your deck and draw a starting hand of seven cards. Put the rest of your deck face down in front of you.
You and your opponent each choose a Basic Pokémon card from your hands and put them face down. These will be your starting Active Pokémon.
Each player may, if he or she wishes, choose up to five Basic Pokémon cards from his or her hand and put them face down on his or her Bench (this is where Pokémon wait when they're not Active Pokémon).
After each player has put down his or her Basic Pokémon, put the top six cards of your deck face down in front of you. These are your Prizes, which you take when your opponent's Pokémon are Knocked Out. You can't look at a Prize card until you take it.
Then show your hand to your opponent, shuffle it back into your deck, and draw seven new cards. Your opponent can then choose to draw an extra card. If you still don't have any Basic Pokémon cards in your new hand, you repeat this process, but your opponent can draw an extra card each time!
Flip over all of the Active and Benched Pokémon that have been put on the table.

Energy Symbol Key
http://www.pokemon-tcg.com/img/power_green.gif-Grass
http://www.pokemon-tcg.com/img/power_yellow.gif-Lightning
http://www.pokemon-tcg.com/img/power_white.gif-Normal
http://www.pokemon-tcg.com/img/power_red.gif-Fire
http://www.pokemon-tcg.com/img/power_purple.gif-Psychic
http://www.pokemon-tcg.com/img/power_black.gif-Dark
http://www.pokemon-tcg.com/img/power_blue.gif-Water
http://www.pokemon-tcg.com/img/power_orange.gif-Fighting
http://www.pokemon-tcg.com/img/power_metal.gif-Metal

Playing the Game
Playing the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game is easy! Here's how it's done:

DRAW a card.You begin your turn by drawing a card. (If your deck is empty at the beginning of your turn so you can't draw a card, the game is over, and your opponent wins.)

When you start a new game, the player who goes first skips drawing his or her first card.

Now DO ANY of these you want in whatever order you want:

PUT Basic Pokémon cards on the Bench (as many as you want).
Choose a Basic Pokémon card from your hand and put it face up on your Bench. You can have no more than five Pokémon on your Bench at any time, so you can put a new Basic Pokémon card there only if your Bench has four or fewer Pokémon on it. If your Active Pokémon gets Knocked Out (or leaves play for any other reason), you have to replace it with a Pokémon from your Bench right away (or you lose the game).

EVOLVE Pokémon (as many as you want).
If you have a card in your hand that says "Evolves from so-and-so" and so-and-so is the name of a Pokémon you already have in play, you may play that card in your hand on top of the Pokémon so-and-so. This is called "evolving" a Pokémon.

Example: Steve has a card called Ivysaur that says "Evolves from Bulbasaur," and he has a Bulbasaur card in play. He may play the Ivysaur card on top of the Bulbasaur card.

You may evolve a Basic Pokémon to a Stage 1 Pokémon, or a Stage 1 Pokémon to a Stage 2 Pokémon. When a Pokémon evolves, it keeps all cards attached to it (Energy cards, Evolution cards, etc.) and any damage it might already have, but the old attacks and Poké-Powers and Poké-Bodies of the Pokémon it evolved from go away. All other things about the Pokémon go away, such as Special Conditions or anything else that might be the result of an attack some Pokémon made earlier.

Note: You can't evolve a Pokémon that you just played or evolved on that turn. Also, neither player can evolve a Pokémon on the first turn. And finally, yes, you can evolve a Pokémon on your Bench - that counts as "in play"!

ATTACH 1 Energy to one of your Pokémon (only once per turn).
Take an Energy card from your hand and attach it to one of your Pokémon in play, either your Active Pokémon or one of your Benched ones, but NOT both (put it under the Pokémon card).

Unlike most of the other things you can do during your turn, you may do this only once during your turn. Also, remember that you can attach an Energy card to a Pokémon on your Bench. After all, that's "in play," too!

PLAY Trainer cards (as many as you want).
When you want to play a Trainer card, do what it says, then put it in the discard pile. You may play only one Supporter card and only one Stadium card per turn.

RETREAT your Active Pokémon (only once per turn).
If your Active Pokémon has lots of damage counters on it, you might want to retreat it and bring in one of the Pokémon on your Bench to fight instead. But on most turns, you probably won't retreat.

To retreat your Active Pokémon, you must discard one Energy from it for each listed for its Retreat Cost. If there aren't any for its Retreat Cost, it retreats for free. (You'll read more about costs in the "ATTACK!" section.) Then you can switch it with a Pokémon from your Bench. Keep damage counters, Evolution cards, and Energy cards (other than the ones you had to discard) with the two Pokémon when they switch.

A Pokémon that is Asleep or Paralyzed can't retreat.

When your Active Pokémon goes to your Bench (whether it retreated or got there some other way), some things about it do go away - Special Conditions (Asleep, Burned, Confused, Paralyzed, and Poisoned) and anything else other than damage that might be the result of an attack some Pokémon made earlier. For more about Special Conditions, check out the Expert Rules section.

If you retreat, you can still attack that turn with the new Active Pokémon.

USE Poké-Powers (as many as you want)
Some Pokémon have special "Poké-Powers" that they can use when they're in play. (Remember, Benched Pokémon are "in play," too, so they can use Poké-Powers, if they have any.) Many of these Powers can be used before you attack. Each Poké-Power is different, though, so you should read carefully to see how each power works.

A Poké-Power isn't the same as a Pokémon's attack, so if you use a Poké-Power or Poké-Body, you can still attack!

ATTACK!

When you attack, you place damage counters on your opponent's Active Pokémon (also called the "Defending Pokémon"). This is the last thing you can do during your turn. You are only allowed to attack once during your turn (if your Pokémon has two attacks, it can use only one of them each turn). Say the name of the attack you're using, and then follow the rest of the steps below!

CHECK to make sure you have enough Energy attached to your Active Pokémon to attack.

You can use an attack only if you have at least the required amount of Energy attached to your Active Pokémon.

Any kind of Energy - G, Fr, W, L, P, Ft, C, D or M - can count toward Colorless Energy requirements ©. But for the other eight kinds of Energy, only Energy of the appropriate kind counts toward Energy requirements of that kind. For example, you can use an attack with LLC next to it only if that Pokémon has at least 3 Energy attached to it, at least two of which are L Energy.

You have to have the required amount of Energy attached to a Pokémon to use its attack, but you don't have to discard those cards to attack. The cards stay attached to your Pokémon unless the attack says otherwise!

CHECK Weakness and Resistance of your opponent's Pokémon.
Some Pokémon have Weakness or Resistance to Pokémon of certain other types. (For example, Torchic has Weakness to W Pokémon.) Look to see if the Defending Pokémon has Weakness or Resistance to the Attacking Pokémon's type. The Defending Pokémon takes double damage from a Pokémon that it has Weakness to, and it takes 30 less damage from a Pokémon that it has Resistance to. When Benched Pokémon receive damage, do not apply Weakness or Resistance.

PLACE damage counters on your opponent's Pokémon.
When you attack, place a damage counter on your opponent's Active Pokémon for each 10 damage your Pokémon's attack does (written to the right of the attack name). If an attack says to do something else, be sure to do that, too!

Usually the attack doesn't depend on the order you do this in, but if it does, then this is how you figure it out! First, pay any costs (discarding Energy cards, for example). Second, apply any effects on the Attacking Pokémon. Next, apply Weakness and Resistance for the Defending Pokémon. Finally, apply any other effects on the Defending Pokémon.

CHECK to see if your Pokémon Knocked Out your opponent's Pokémon.
If a Pokémon ever has total damage at least equal to its Hit Points (for example, five or more damage counters on a Pokémon with 50 HP), it's immediately Knocked Out.

TAKE a Prize (if you Knocked Out your opponent's Pokémon).
Whenever you Knock Out your opponent's Pokémon, your opponent puts its Basic Pokémon card and all cards attached to it (Evolution cards, Energy cards, and so on) in his or her discard pile. You then choose one of your Prizes (you do this even if your opponent Knocked Out his or her own Pokémon, or if it is Knocked Out between turns!) and put it into your hand. After that, your opponent must replace his or her Active Pokémon with a Pokémon from his or her Bench. (If your opponent can't do this because his or her Bench is empty, you win!) If your Active Pokémon and your opponent's Active Pokémon are Knocked Out at the same time, the player whose turn it is replaces his or her Pokémon last. The player whose turn it is chooses his or her Prize last as well.

Your turn is OVER now.

Sometimes there are things to do after your turn is over but before your opponent's turn begins. After you do those things, your opponent's turn begins.


What Happens if a Card Tells You to Draw More Cards than You Have Left?
If a card tells you to do something to a certain number of the top cards of your deck, and you have fewer cards than that left in your deck, do whatever you're supposed to do to the cards that you have left and continue play as normal. For example, if a card tells you to draw seven cards or to look at the top five cards of your deck, and you have only three cards left in your deck, you draw the top three or look at the top three. Remember, you lose if you can't draw a card at the beginning of your turn, not if you can't draw one because a card told you to.

Illegal Evolutions
Whenever you evolve a Pokémon, the Evolution card has to say it "Evolves from" the name of the Pokémon it goes on top of. Special Trainer Pokémon (such as Erika's Oddish) or Pokémon-ex (like Scyther ex) don't evolve into normal versions. A Pokémon card would have to state "Evolves from Scyther ex" to allow for that evolution.

What's New in the Pokémon-e TCG: EX Ruby and Sapphire Expansion?The Pokémon-e TCG: EX Ruby and Sapphire Expansion introduces Pokémon-ex. Pokémon-ex are a stronger form of Pokémon possessing better attacks, but with a special drawback: when an opponent defeats your Pokémon-ex, they take two Prize cards, instead of one. Pokémon-ex can show up in a variety of forms: most are Basic Pokémon, but there are legends of evolved forms. Because Pokémon-ex are different, they don't evolve into "normal" Stage 1 or Stage 2 Pokémon.

In addition, some of the basic rules have changed from previous editions, allowing the game to improve while working with all of the earlier cards.

When you start a game without Basic Pokémon in your hand, show your hand to your opponent, shuffle it back into your deck, and draw seven new cards. Your opponent can then choose to draw an extra card.

When you start a new game, the player who goes first skips his or her first draw card step.

The Special Condition Confused now only affects a Confused Pokémon when it attacks. As it attacks flip a coin as usual, but on a tails, the Confused Pokémon receives three damage counters, instead of the previous 20 damage. Confused Pokémon can now retreat normally.

Retreating your Active Pokémon is now an action that can only be done once per turn.

Darkness and Metal Energy are now easier to play. They still count as special energy, giving their special effects only to Pokémon of the matching type. As they give effects strictly to those Pokémon, the other drawbacks to those energy types have been removed.

Players are now limited to playing one Stadium card each turn.

Finally, there's a new way to play the Pokémon trading card game, 2-on-2 Battle. It's fun, but tricky…make sure you master the basic game before trying this extra game.


What's New in the Pokémon-e TCG: EX Sandstorm Expansion?

EX Sandstorm dives headlong into the desert winds with this latest expansion. New kinds of Fossils have been uncovered in the shifting sands, while elsewhere Trainers have spotted evolved forms of Pokémon-ex deep in the desert.

Pokémon-ex now receive a huge boost in power as they evolve. Players can evolve their normal Pokémon into Stage 1 and Stage 2 forms of special Pokémon-ex. The stakes get even higher though, with nearly twice of the normal HP, but double the Weaknesses.

New kinds of Fossil Pokémon evolve from special Trainer cards, such as Claw Fossil. These Trainer cards act exactly like Basic Pokémon cards, once they are in play. In addition, if you start a game without Basic Pokémon in your hand, but have any number of Fossil Trainer cards, you have the choice of whether or not to shuffle your hand back into your deck and draw 7 new cards. (If you choose to re-draw a hand of 7 cards, your opponent still chooses whether or not to draw an extra card.)

Baby Pokémon are making a comeback! They’ve been simplified as Basic Pokémon, with a Poké-Power, “Baby Evolution”. This kind of Poké-Power is unique – it can even be used if the Pokémon is affected by a Special Condition! What they’ve lost in defense, they make up for in tricks

2-on-2 Battle becomes even more exciting with a larger variety of cards that improve this game play variant. Be sure to read your new cards carefully – some of the cards get much more powerful when they refer to “each Defending Pokémon”! Complete rules for this new way to play the game can be found in Appendix A, found in the back of the rulebook.

What's New in the Pokémon-e TCG: EX Dragon Expansion?
The Pokémon-e TCG: EX Dragon Expansion unleashes a flight of powerful Dragon-type Pokémon, challenging players to whole new level of play. Also, some Pokémon-ex of this set have twice the number of Resistances, making them tough foes to beat – you’ll need to play smart to win

EX Dragon also introduces a new Weakness – Colorless! Fortunately it means that only Colorless Pokémon do double damage against your Pokémon with that Weakness, not every kind of Pokémon.

There are also new Stadium cards, like High Pressure System. A Stadium card stays in play until another Stadium card replaces it. Players are still limited to playing only one Stadium card each turn, making for some hard decisions!

The 2-on-2 Battle game option gets even more exciting! In this variation of the game, each player can have up to 2 Active Pokémon. Certain cards printed in the EX series will have greater effect – either affecting both Defending Pokémon or sometimes drawing upon the power of all of the Active Pokémon in play! In the EX Dragon expansion, players will find plenty of attacks on their new Pokémon, that get even better during 2-on-2 Battle! Complete rules for this extra game variant can be found in Appendix A of the rulebook(if you have it).

What's New in the Pokémon-e TCG: EX Team Magma vs Team Aqua Expansion?

The Pokémon-e TCG: EX Team Magma vs Team Aqua expansion features the battles between Team Magma Pokémon and Team Aqua Pokémon, drawing the players into an epic fray. Each side uses their own tricks to get ahead of the game – make sure to master their tricks to develop your own.

EX Team Magma vs Team Aqua shows off a new challenge – dual Energy type Pokémon! They count as both types at the same time, making them a strong threat against a variety of Weaknesses. For example, “Team Magma’s Groudon” is both a Fighting and Darkness type Pokémon. It counts as a Darkness type Pokémon when checking to see if Darkness Energy adds 10 damage to its attack, and deals double damage to the Defending Pokémon if that Pokémon has a Weakness to either Fighting or Darkness.

Many Pokémon in this expansion are either "Team Magma” or “Team Aqua.” These Pokémon are treated a little differently than regular Pokémon, as they cannot evolve from (or into) regular Pokémon. “Team Magma’s Numel” can evolve into “Team Magma’s Camerupt,” but could not evolve into a regular “Camerupt.” A regular Numel still evolves into Camerupt, but could not evolve into “Team Magma’s Camerupt.”

New Special Energy cards are also introduced in this expansion – “Magma Energy” and “Aqua Energy.” Unlike other types of Energy cards, these produce 2 Energy at a time. For example, Magma Energy provides both Darkness and Fighting Energy, without the bonus damage that comes with Darkness Energy.

What's New in the Pokémon TCG: EX Hidden Legends Expansion?
The Pokémon TCG: EX Hidden Legends expansion features tough-to-find Pokémon, as well as other mysterious Pokémon. New Stadium cards offer new and exciting battle arenas for your next Pokémon battle

Special Dual Energy type Pokémon continue to shine in this expansion. They count as both types at the same time, making them a strong threat against a variety of Weaknesses. It helps to keep track of the Defending Pokémon’s Resistances though, as you’re doubling the chance they have some kind of protection.

New Castform Pokémon have been found in the wild! In their different forms, they gain extra attack power with the appropriate weather Stadium card in play. If you face off against an opponent’s Castform, make sure you check the forecast!

Certain cards in this set refer to “Pokémon that has an owner in its name”. These cards affect the various Pokémon with trainers’ names from earlier sets (such as Misty’s Tentacool), as well as “Team Magma’s” and “Team Aqua’s” Pokémon from the recent EX Team Magma vs Team Aqua TCG expansion.

What's New in the Pokémon TCG: EX FireRed & LeafGreen Expansion?
The Pokémon TCG: EX FireRed & LeafGreen expansion features some of your favorite Pokémon, with new attacks and exciting tricks. This set features a wider range of Trainer cards and an exciting variety of powerful Pokémon-ex, enhancing your deck to the next level!

They're introducing a new rule for the Pokémon Trading Card Game. Starting with this set, Supporter cards have an extra restriction: On the first turn of the game, the starting player cannot play any Supporter cards. This rule provides additional balance for the most potent Trainer cards, and promotes more interesting game play.

What's New in the Pokémon TCG: EX Team Rocket Returns Expansion?
The Pokémon TCG: EX Team Rocket Returns expansion features an exciting mix of different Pokémon types and powerful attacks. Team Rocket is blasting off with the most powerful Dark Pokémon ever!

Dark Pokémon are Darkness-type Pokémon that can also show up as dual Energy types. When any Pokémon has multiple Energy types, the Pokémon counts as both Energy types at the same time. When a Pokémon attacks, it checks Weakness and Resistance for all of its various types – it could be the Defending Pokémon has both Weakness and Resistance to the Attacking Pokémon.

Special Pokémon “star” show up for the first time! They’re slightly stronger than the regular forms of that Pokémon, but you’re limited to having just 1 Pokémon "star" in your deck. These Pokémon have stronger attacks that kick in when you’re catching up to your opponent.

In addition, there are special Rocket’s Secret Machine Trainer cards that can be found in this expansion. They act just like normal Trainer cards, but with tricky boost in their power.

Certain cards refer to “Pokémon that has an owner in its name”. These cards affect the various Pokémon with trainers’ names from earlier sets (such as Misty’s Tentacool, or Team Magma’s Baltoy) as well as “Rocket’s” Pokémon from this set.

What's New in the Pokémon TCG: EX Deoxys Expansion?
The Pokémon TCG: EX Deoxys expansion features powerful challengers: Deoxys and Rayquaza. That's not all*while some of the Pokémon rely on special moves, many of these Pokemon rely on their high HP and strong damaging attacks to win their battles!

Special Pokémon continue to shine. They're slightly stronger than the regular forms of that Pokémon without the Prize card drawback of Pokémon-ex. Instead, you're limited to having just 1 Pokémon in your deck... so, choose carefully! The Pokémon in this set have stronger attacks that kick in when you're facing an opponent who has Pokémon-ex in play.

Certain cards refer to "Pokémon that has an owner in its name." These cards affect the various Pokémon with Trainers' names from earlier sets, such as Misty's Tentacool, Team Magma's Baltoy, or Rocket's Meowth.


How Do You Make a New Deck?
Your deck has to have exactly 60 cards, and you can't have more than four of any one card other than basic Energy cards in your deck (the basic Energy cards are G, Fr, W, L, P and Ft). A card counts as the same as another card if it has the same name - it doesn't matter whether the cards have different art or come from different sets. So, for example, you could have four Brock's Sandshrew and 4 Sandshrew in your deck, but you can't have more than four Pokémon named Sandshrew total even if they were different versions of Sandshrew.

To make a new deck, first notice that all of the cards other than the Trainers have different Energy types on them. Your deck should probably include one or two of the basic Energy types, and you can choose to add some Colorless Pokémon if you like. If you just choose one Energy type, you will always have the right kind of Energy for your Pokémon but not as much variety. If you have several Energy types, you'll have more Pokémon to choose from, but you'll run the risk of sometimes not drawing the right type of Energy for your Pokémon. And be sure your deck has enough Energy cards (most decks need 20 to 25).

Once you choose your Energy types, pick Pokémon and Trainer cards that work well together. Do you want to build up big Pokémon to crush your opponent? Then put in a lot of Evolution cards and some Trainer cards, like Poké Ball, that help you find those Evolution cards.

After you make your deck, play it as often as you can against as many other decks as you can. See what works and what doesn't, and then make changes. If you keep working at it, you'll have a deck that will show everyone you're the greatest Pokémon Master of all time!


What Counts as an Attack?
Anything written on a Basic Pokémon or Evolution card under the picture where attacks are found (except for a Poké-Power or Poké-Body) is considered an attack even if it doesn't do anything to your opponent's Pokémon. So, for example, Linoone's Seek Out and Poochyena's Knock Off would be prevented by an effect like Magmar ex's Smokescreen.

In What Order Do You Do Your Attack?The exact steps to go through when attacking are listed here. For most attacks, it won't matter what order you do things in, but if you have to work your way through a really complicated attack, follow these steps in order and you should be fine.

If the Defending Pokémon is a Baby Pokémon, flip a coin to see if your turn ends without an attack. (If your turn ends without an attack, don't do any of the other steps. You're done now.)
Announce which attack your Active Pokémon is using. Make sure your Pokémon has enough Energy attached to it to use this attack.
If necessary, make any choices the attack requires you to make. (For example, Swampert's Water Arrow attack says "Choose one of your opponent's Pokémon." So you choose now.)
If necessary, do anything the attack requires you to do in order to use it. (For example, discard Energy cards, as in Camerupt's Fire Spin attack, which makes you discard 2 basic Energy cards attached to Camerupt in order to use it.)
If necessary, apply any effects that might alter or cancel the attack. (For example, if your Pokémon was hit last turn by Magmar ex's Smokescreen attack, that attack said that if you tried to attack with that Pokémon during your next turn, you should flip a coin. If tails, your Pokémon's attack does nothing.)
If your Active Pokémon is Confused, check now to see if the attack fails.
Do whatever the attack says. Do any damage first, then do any other effects, and finally, Knock Out any Pokémon that have damage greater than or equal to their Hit Points.

How Do You Figure Out the Damage?
Usually the amount of damage an attack does won't depend on the order in which you do things. But if you have to figure out an attack in which a lot of different things might change the damage, follow these steps in order (skip any steps that don't apply to that attack).

Start with the base damage. This is the number written to the right of the attack, or, if that number has an Ą, -, +, or ? next to it, it's the amount of damage the attack text tells you to do.
Figure out damage effects on the Attacking Pokémon (for example, Darkness Energy effect, or Ralt's Link Blast). Then if the base damage is 0 (or if the attack doesn't do any damage at all), just stop figuring the damage. You're done now. Otherwise, keep going.
Double the damage if the Defending Pokémon has Weakness to the Attacking Pokémon's type.
Subtract 30 damage if the Defending Pokémon has Resistance to the Attacking Pokémon's type.
Figure out damage effects of Trainer cards and Energy cards on the Defending Pokémon (like Metal Energy).
Apply any relevant effects resulting from the Defending Pokémon's last attack (for example, Aron's Teary Eyes) or relevant Poké-Powers and Poké-Bodies.
For each 10 damage the attack ends up doing, place one damage counter on the Defending Pokémon. (If at this point the damage done turns out to be less than 0, don't do anything.)
Now that damage has been done, if the attack does anything other than damage, do all of that.

In What Order Do Things Happen after Each Player's Turn?
Usually it doesn't matter in what order you do things after each player's turn, but if things get complicated, follow these steps in order.

Place damage counters on any Poisoned Pokémon.
Flip a coin to see if Pokémon with Burn markers get damage counters placed on them.
Flip a coin to see if Asleep Pokémon recover, and have eligible Paralyzed Pokémon recover.

If a Pokémon has a Pokémon Tool card attached to it and that card does something between turns, that card can be used at any time between turns that the person who played the Pokémon wants.

If your Pokémon and your opponent's Pokémon are Knocked Out at the same time between turns or during an attack, the player who is about to take a turn replaces his or her Pokémon first (and chooses his or her Prize card first as well).

Pokémon that Refer to Themselves
Sometimes a Pokémon refers to itself by name. For example, Goldeen's Flail attack says "Does 10 damage for each damage counter on Goldeen." Read the name as "this Pokémon" if the attack somehow gets used by another Pokémon. So if Togetic copies Goldeen's Flail with Mini-Metronome, Togetic would do 10 damage for each damage counter on it, just as if Togetic said "Does 10 damage for each damage counter on this Pokémon" on it.

How Do You Retreat Using Double Energy Cards?
Paying Retreat Costs can get confusing with Double Energy cards. Here's the way it works: Discard Energy cards one at a time until you've paid the Retreat Cost (or maybe more). Once you've paid the cost, you can't discard any more cards.

For example, suppose your Pokémon has a Retreat Cost of CC and it has two Fr Energy cards and a CC Energy card attached. You can pay the Retreat Cost in several ways - by discarding CC, by discarding two Fr, or by discarding Fr first and then CC. You can't discard all three cards, though.

What Happens if a Card Tells You to Draw More Cards than You Have Left?
If a card tells you to do something to a certain number of the top cards of your deck, and you have fewer cards than that left in your deck, do whatever you're supposed to do to the cards that you have left and continue play as normal. For example, if a card tells you to draw seven cards or to look at the top five cards of your deck, and you have only three cards left in your deck, you draw the top three or look at the top three. Remember, you lose if you can't draw a card at the beginning of your turn, not if you can't draw one because a card told you to.

What Happens if Neither Player Gets a Basic Pokémon Card in His or Her First seven Cards?
Sometimes neither you nor your opponent get any Basic Pokémon cards in your first hands of seven cards. If this happens, both players shuffle and draw seven new cards. In this case, neither player gets to draw an extra card. Repeat this process until at least one of the players has a Basic Pokémon card in his or her hand of seven cards. If the other player still doesn't have a Basic Pokémon card in his or her hand, that player can shuffle and draw seven new cards, but the player who already has a Basic Pokémon card can draw an extra card as usual. Continue this process until each player has a Basic Pokémon card in his or her hand of seven cards.

If anybody has anything to add on to this feel free to post.
Or if you see anything wrong go ahead and correct it ^_^

P.S. Credit goes to Zelgaguide and the official TCG website.
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Go beyond logic. Live beyond reason. Choose your eternity.
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SPEAK OUT! If you got something to say, then SAY IT! Stand up for what you believe in. Don't be a wuss or another face in this world of endless trends that we live in. Sometimes you may have to stand alone, but you're the only army that you'll ever need. You can speak life into death, You can speak love into hate, You can speak peace into turmoil. Your words have power, fear no one or no thing.

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Last edited by Chareon; 08-02-2005 at 05:17 PM.
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  #2  
Old 04-08-2005 (04:50 AM)
Ash
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Default AW: Rukario's Basic Rules an Gameplay

Do you write this on your own???
Or copy it somewhere? when it is copied then please give the urls where is it copyed from. otherwize it is a very great job you had done!
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  #3  
Old 04-08-2005 (02:53 PM)
Conan Edogawa Conan Edogawa est déconnecté
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Default Re: Rukario's Basic Rules an Gameplay

Wait, what is this for? Playing online or real life or in forums?
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Old 04-08-2005 (03:07 PM)
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Default Re: Rukario's Basic Rules an Gameplay

Thank you very much for the nice guide LR.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaitou
Wait, what is this for? Playing online or real life or in forums?
Since when do you play TCGs online or in forums?
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Old 04-08-2005 (08:32 PM)
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Default Re: Rukario's Basic Rules an Gameplay

I know some people who play Magic (another card game) on a chat and they say it's great..... They use the decks they really have and (naturally) trust each other enough to know they aren't cheating, but it does work.....
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